[vc_row attachment=”scroll” fluid=”no” padding=”no-padding” margin=”no-margin”][vc_column align=”” class_type=”md” width=”1/1″ animation=”” animation_delay=”” animation_duration=””][rs_banner_heading weight=”600″ heading=”5 Ways To Make Architectural Photography Stand Out” size=”42px” spacing=”0.1em” color=”#5f5f5f” top=”0px” bottom=”16px”][vc_column_text]

Professional architectural photographer Jerry Suhrstedt writes about ways to make your photography stand out.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row attachment=”scroll” fluid=”no” padding=”no-padding” margin=”custom-margin” m_top=”40px” m_bottom=”0px”][vc_column align=”” class_type=”md” width=”1/1″ animation=”” animation_delay=”” animation_duration=””][vc_column_text text_color=”#5f5f5f” text_size=”16px”]The most successful photographs of buildings or landmarks make a site feel alive and multi-dimensional. So what are some ideas for how architectural photography can achieve this?

1. Shoot in the dark or at twilight

We’ve written about why we like twilight photography before, but we also like nighttime photography. Bright lights and a rich, blue-black sky lend a fresh perspective, especially in an urban setting. It can also be fun to play with silhouettes and shadows.

2. Include people in the photo

Traditional architectural photos don’t include people, but for certain settings, humans give dimension and life to a photo. For example, it can be nice to include a chef at work in a kitchen on a restaurant website or front desk staff at work in a hotel lobby. After all, that is how customers will see your venue in real life.

3. Play with perspective

What does your site look like from the ground, looking up? Or from a few floors up, looking down? A good photographer will explore the composition beyond eye-level.

4. Try black & white as well as color

Black and white images are best for when color is a distraction in the photo, rather than an asset. How do you know when to use which? First, any photo that’s shot digitally in color can be edited to be black and white after the fact. But the photos we like best for b&w are ones where we want to highlight composition, lines, and contrast more than we want to show vibrance or warmth.

5. Don’t rule out gloomy weather.

Being in the Pacific Northwest, we have to deal with our fair share of clouds and rain. Fret not, because sometimes this makes for more interesting photos! Clouds can help diffuse bright sunlight and keep harsh shadows away.

At Jerry Suhrstedt Photography, we like to bring an interesting point of view to architectural photography. At the same time, we make sure our images are realistic and not over-stylized. Please contact us if that sounds like something your business can benefit from.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Jerry Suhrstedt Administrator
Jerry has spent the past 25 years in marketing strategy, advertising, branding, graphic design, photography, video, and visual communications.
follow me
×
Jerry Suhrstedt Administrator
Jerry has spent the past 25 years in marketing strategy, advertising, branding, graphic design, photography, video, and visual communications.
follow me
Latest Posts
  • Hospitality Photographer Blacksheep
  • Garrette Homes Leske Realty Real Estate Photography